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Technical Writing
Resources


Included in this section are hypertexts composed by authors with explicit expertise in technical or scientific fields, or by technical writers who interpret technical or scientific topics for a nonspecialist audience. We include links to sites that explain the field of technical writing and its genres, along with references to aid technical writers.

Technical Writing Pubs & References

The EServer Tech Comm Library at Iowa State University:

  • http://tc.eserver.org/
    The EServer TC Library is an experiment in community-based libraries -- part web portal, part library index -- for professional, scientific and technical communicators. They are based in the Department of Technical Communication at the University of Washington in Seattle. Collaborating with academic librarians and with international advisory and editorial boards, the overall goal of this website is to provide technical communication practitioners, students, teachers and professionals (especially those with limited resources) access to the best resources available online.

Gary Conroy.com

Internet Resources for Technical Communicators

  • http://www.soltys.ca/techcomm.html
    Although not as graphic savvy as Gary-Convoy.com, it still is another top site that offers great resource links, jobs, reviews, articles, and updated news. Good all around specialized site.

Technical Writing Genres

Instructions

Format and Commentary at Virginia Tech:

  • http://fbox.vt.edu/eng/mech/writing/workbooks/instruct.html
    These guidelines are designed to help you, the engineering or science student, perform technical writing assignments in your laboratory, design, and technical communication classes. In these guidelines, you will find discussions of several common documents in engineering writing and scientific writing. For these types of documents, you will find models written by other students.

 

Memos

Format and Commentary at Virginia Tech:

  • http://fbox.vt.edu/eng/mech/writing/workbooks/memo.html
    These guidelines are designed to help you, the engineering or science student, perform technical writing assignments in your laboratory, design, and technical communication classes. In these guidelines, you will find discussions of several common documents in engineering writing and scientific writing. For these types of documents, you will find models written by other students.

Procedures

Capital Community College on the Process Essay

  • http://cctc2.commnet.edu/grammar/composition/process.htm
    The first essay assigned in a Composition course is often the so-called process essay, the writing project in which we describe how to do something or tell how something happens. The nice thing about the process essay is that it can be truly helpful. When our readers finish this essay, they will know how to do something that they didn't know how to do before or they will understand some process that had mystified them before.

LEO: Literacy Education Online
Writing a Process Essay

Proposals

Format and Commentary by Roger Munger of ATTW:

Format and Commentary at Virginia Tech:

  • http://fbox.vt.edu/eng/mech/writing/workbooks/proposals.html
    Writing Courses Proposal Links: Proposal Request Sample Proposals Proposal Checklist A proposal is a plan for solving a problem. Engineers and scientists write proposals to do such things as research turbulent boundary layers, design turbine blades, and construct jet aircraft engines. The audience for a proposal usually includes both managers and engineers. These audiences view proposals in different ways. For instance, managers review proposals to see if the plan for solving the problem is cost effective. Engineers and scientists, on the other hand, review proposals to see if the plan is technically feasible.

National Science FoundationGrant Proposal Guide

  • http://www.nsf.gov/nsf/nsfpubs/gpg/start.htm
    The proposal should present the (1) objectives and scientific or educational significance of the proposed work; (2) suitability of the methods to be employed; (3) qualifications of the investigator and the grantee organization; (4) effect of the activity on the infrastructure of science, engineering, and education in these areas; and (5) amount of funding required. It should present the merits of the proposed project clearly and should be prepared with the care and thoroughness of a paper submitted for publication.

A Practical Guide for Writing Proposals
by Alice Reid, M. Ed.

  • http://www.members.dca.net/areid/proposal.htm
    The general purpose of any proposal is to persuade the readers to do something --  whether it is to persuade a potential customer to purchase goods and/or services, or to persuade your employer to fund a project or to implement a program that you would like to launch.

The University of Toronto's Engineering Communication Centre

 

Reports

Format and Commentary at Virginia Tech on Progress Reports:

  • http://fbox.vt.edu/eng/mech/writing/workbooks/prog.html
    These guidelines are designed to help you, the engineering or science student, perform technical writing assignments in your laboratory, design, and technical communication classes. In these guidelines, you will find discussions of several common documents in engineering writing and scientific writing. For these types of documents, you will find models written by other students.

General Advice on Writing Progress Reports

  • http://fbox.vt.edu/eng/mech/writing/ workbooks/prog.html
    Once you have written a successful proposal and have secured the resources to do a project, you are expected to update the client on the progress of that project. This updating is usually handled by progress reports, which can take many forms: memoranda, letters, short reports, formal reports, or presentations. What information is expected in a progress report?

Web Page Design

Mike Markel's Web Design Tutorial

  • http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/markel_tutorial/
    This tutorial presents a brief overview of the process of creating a Web site, introduces you to important design principles to consider as you design a site, and helps you analyze the design of sample Web pages.

The National Center for Supercomputing Applications

NetLingo: the Internet Language Dictionary

Writing for Effective Web Pages by The University of St. Thomas

Association of Teachers
of Technical Writing (ATTW):
http://www.attw.org

Society for Technical
Communication:
http://www.stc.org

Council on Programs
in Technical and Scientific Communication:
http://www.cptsc.org/

IEEE Professional
Communication Society:
http://www.ieeepcs.org/

Pubsnet
http://www3.niu.edu/
publications/pubsnet.html


Yale Web Style Guide

http://www.webstyleguide.com
/index.html?/

 

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